VALERIE’S VIEW from the Greenhouse!

SHRUBS!

We have customers coming in that have moved here from out-of-state. They moved here because they love the Sunsets and the natural beauty of our landscapes. These landscapes are simple, low-maintenance and on the drought tolerant side. What adds to the beauty, is our turquoise skies, New Mexico averages less than 13 inches of rainfall per year. 

We have landscapes that incorporate Piñon trees, Junipers, Chamisa, Apache Plume, Mountain Mahogany and other native plantings. Although, not native to our area, Russian Sage is planted everywhere in town because it is a very drought tolerant shrub.

But we also have Rose of Sharon (Althea) which very popular, Caryopteris aka Blue Mist Spirea, Butterfly Bushes and Barberry. We also have some that keep their leaves during the winter months like Boxwoods and Oregon Grape.

COME IN AND SEE WHAT WE HAVE IN STOCK.
HAPPY GARDENING!
 

ASK THE GARDEN GURU!

DO YOU KNOW WHICH SWEET SMELLING PLANTS ARE WINTER HARDY IN NEW MEXICO?

ANOTHER GREAT QUESTION!

In this week’s archived show from previous years, the Garden Guru chatted about which plants make our gardens smell so sweet! Lynn mentioned that lavender is one of those plants! Lynn said, “It’s a great plant for northern New Mexico mainly because its drought tolerant and I know drought has been an unfortunate buzzword in our vocabulary lately, but Lavender will survive the drought very nicely!”

With Lavender there’s four basic varieties: English, Spanish, French and then hybrids of those groups. In total there’s probably over 100 different species and cultivars but the only ones that are winter hardy in Northern New Mexico are … well, you’ll have to listen to the Garden Guru for that information!

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE GARDEN GURU’S ARCHIVED RADIO SHOW ON THIS TOPIC.

HAPPY GARDENING!

CELEBRATE NATIONAL POLLINATOR WEEK – JUNE 17 – 23, 2024!

PAYNE’S NURSERIES OWN LYNN PAYNE REQUESTED AND SUCCEEDED IN THE GOVERNOR ISSUING A PROCLAMATION THAT DEEMS EVERY YEAR ABOUT THIS TIME AS 

NATIONAL POLLINATOR WEEK IN NEW MEXICO!

Pollinator Week is an annual celebration in support of pollinator health that was initiated and is managed by Pollinator Partnership. It is a time to raise awareness for pollinators and spread the word about what we can do to protect them. The great thing about Pollinator Week is that you can celebrate and get involved any way you like! CLICK here for the website.

Pollinator Week 2024 is a celebration of the vital role that pollinators play in our ecosystems, economies, and agriculture. Under the inspiring theme “Vision 2040: Thriving ecosystems, economies, and agriculture,” this year’s event urges us to envision a future where pollinators not only survive but thrive. These essential creatures, including bees, butterflies, moths, bats, beetles, and hummingbirds, are the unsung heroes behind the food we enjoy and the beauty that surrounds us. 

HERE ARE SOME INTERESTING FACTS:

What is pollination?

Pollination is a vital stage in the life cycle of all flowering plants. When pollen is moved within a flower or carried from one flower to another of the same species it leads to fertilization.

This transfer of pollen is necessary for healthy and productive native & agricultural ecosystems.

About 75% of all flowering plant species need the help of animals to move their heavy pollen grains from plant to plant for fertilization. 

About 1,000 of all pollinators are vertebrates such as birds, bats, and small mammals. Most pollinators (about 200,000 species) are beneficial insects such as flies, beetles, wasps, ants, butterflies, moths, and bees. Why are pollinators important? Pollinators are often keystone species, meaning that they are critical to an ecosystem. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere.An estimated 1/3 of all foods and beverages depend on pollinators.

Create pollinator-friendly habitat with native flowering plants that supply pollinators with nectar, pollen, and homes. Here are some plants that Payne’s has in stock that help pollinators:

Aster
Borage
Butterfly Bush
Coneflower
Cow Parsnip
Dahlia
Daisy
Fennel
Fuchsia
Goldenrod
Lavender
Marigold and more!

WHAT TO DO NOW IN JUNE! PLANT PERENNIALS

perennials

Payne’s Just Received a Large Shipment of Perennials, Herbs and Houseplants!

claysoilIf you have heavy clay soil, don’t despair; there are perennials that not only tolerate clay, but also can help break up and improve its texture, too, such as native prairie wildflowers and plants with tap roots.

You should, of course, amend your clay with liberal top-dressings of approximately 3 to 4 inches of mulch, well aged compost or animal manure. Then dig or till the amendments in to a depth of 6 inches.

After you’ve mixed in the compost or mulch and planted your plants, then add another 2 to 3 inches of compost or mulch to leave on the surface to help retain the moisture.

PAYNE’S PHOTO OF THE WEEK!

PHOTO OF THE WEEK!

HONEYSUCKLE FROM PAYNE’S 2024 YARD STOCK

—————————————————-
SHARE YOUR PHOTOS! Please keep sending in your photos. 
You Could WIN a $25 Gift Card!
If you have a photo taken in one of our greenhouses or of your own garden orlandscape that contains products from Payne’s, please send it to info@paynes.com!

If your photo is chosen, and used in our e-newsletter website or other marketingmaterials, then you will receive a Gift Certificate from Payne’s for $25!Please make sure to give us your contact information in your email.

ZODIAC SIGNS AND GARDENING? HERE’S THIS CYCLES PROFILE.

by The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here’s THIS MONTHS ZODIAC SIGN PROFILE AND HOW IT CAN HELP YOU GARDEN:


GEMINI (MAY 20 to JUNE 21)
Gemini finishes the spring, but the sense that a change of seasons is near keeps you light and airy. Plants that mimic your style, such as dill, calendula, caraway, and parsley, are easy for you to grow and make your heart dance. Wild carrot and dandelion—whose airborne seeds swirl and twirl in the wind—bring joy and contentment. You find yellow flowers particularly captivating, and dashes of this color can be found liberally in your yard. Salads grace your evening meals (the quickness of “wash and eat” is indescribably tantalizing). Toss some calendula blossoms right in the bowl for an added dash of pizzazz and panache.