HAPPY SUMMER!

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FRESHEN UP YOUR GARDENS AND PATIOS WITH COLORFUL PERENNIALS AND YARD STOCK!
Both Payne’s Location’s have plenty of COLOR left for your gardens.
Stop by and freshen up your patio, or plant more colorful annuals in pots.

We also have plenty of unique, assorted pottery to choose from! Stop by both locations for our complete selection!
Hurry in for the BEST Selection!

WHAT TO DO NOW IN JULY?

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Annuals & Bedding Plants: Time to 
deadhead, deadhead, and deadhead. 
Annuals live to flower and set seed, so if you hinder them from forming seedheads, they’ll keep flowering all summer out of sheer baby-yearning frustration.

Here are some reasons to deadhead regularly:

 

1. Keep plants looking their best
Using scissors or pruning clippers, pick over containers and garden plants several times a week to prevent faded flowers spoiling the display. Undertaken in the cool of the evening, it’s an opportunity to reconnect with your plants before you stand back and admire the results.
2. Extend the display
Pick off flowers to control flower production and time displays so they’re at their best for a particular date. Deadhead summer bedding before you go on holiday – this will avoid dead flowers rotting while you’re away, and you’ll come home to fresh blooms.
3. Prevent damage to leaves
Remove fading flowers from petuniaspelargoniums and busy Lizzies before the petals fall onto the foliage. Wet petals stick to leaves and can cause rotting that leads to unsightly brown patches. Gently shake plants so that loose petals fall away from the leaves.
4. Remove flowers before they seed
Pollinated flowers develop seeds of fruit as soon as their petals fall, diverting the plant’s energy from making more flowers. Sweet peas, in particular, are quick to form pods. Keep cutting the flowers for the house, or remove all the dead flowers promptly.
5. Channel energy into bulbs
Bulbous perennials such as lilies need a chance to replenish their bulbs if they’re to produce a good display of flowers next year. Putting their energy into forming seeds after flowering won’t help this process, so cut off flower heads once their petals fall.
6. Control self-seeding plants
After flowering, many plants produce seeds in abundance. If allowed to fall, these can result in seedlings you may not want. Enthusiastic self-seeders include helleboreslady’s mantleaquilegias and poppies. Snip off seedheads before they ripen and release their contents.

SO SMALL… YET SO MUCH DAMAGE! APHIDS ARE RAMPANT THIS TIME OF YEAR.

aphids

Aphids are tiny (adults are under ¼-inch), and often nearly invisible to the naked eye. Various species can appear white, black, brown, gray, yellow, light green, or even pink! Some may have a waxy or woolly coating. They have pear-shaped bodies with long antennae; the nymphs look similar to adults. Most species have two short tubes (called cornicles) projecting from their hind end.

aphid2Nymphs and adults feed on plant juices, attacking leaves, stems, buds, flowers, fruit, and/or roots, depending on the species. Most aphids especially like succulent or new growth. Some, such as the green peach aphid, feed on a variety of plants, while others, such as the rosy apple aphid, focus on one or just a few plant hosts.

  • Look for misshapen, curling, stunted, or yellowing leaves. Be sure to check the undersides of leaves; aphids love to hide there.
  • If the leaves or stems are covered with a sticky substance, that is a sign that aphids may have been sipping sap. This “honeydew,” a sugary liquid produced by the insects as waste, can attract other insects, such as ants, which gather the substance for food. When aphids feed on trees, their honeydew can drop onto cars, outdoor furniture, driveways, and so on.
  • The honeydew can sometimes encourage a fungal growth called sooty mold, causing branches and leaves to appear black.
  • Flowers or fruit can become distorted or deformed due to feeding aphids.
  • Some aphid species cause galls to form on roots or leaves.
  • Aphids may transmit viruses between plants, and also attract other insects that prey on them, such as ladybugs. Source: almanac.com 

Stop by either location and ask our gardening experts which insecticide would work best for your particular problem.

MUSICIANS PLAY A CONCERT TO AN AUDIENCE OF PLANTS!

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Check out this wonderful video of a chamber music concert performed entirely for plants in Spain! CLICK on any of the images to watch the

Screen Shot 2020-07-09 at 10.46.14 AMRows brimmed with a diversity of 2,292 potted plants as musicians took the stage at Spain’s ornate Gran Teatre del Liceu on June 22, 2020.

 

A string quartet performed the operatic piece “Crisantemi” by Italian composer Giacomo Puccini as cameras panned through the rapt, herbaceous audience. (After a recording asks the verdant attendees to “kindly switch off your mobile phones,” human performers come on stage at 1:20.)

 

The Liceu had been closed since mid-March, when Spain locked down the nation to curb the spread of COVID-19.

 

For the Liceu’s first show since the nation’s reopening, the theater said in a statement that it “welcomes and leads a highly symbolic act that defends the value of art, music and nature as a letter of introduction to our return to activity.”

At the conclusion of the performance, a recording of an applause filled the historic theater.

THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING WITH US!

 COVID-19 MESSAGE
WE WANT TO THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING US!
We’ve made some improvements to comply
with the New Mexico Health Department’s Covid-19 Policies.
We’ve added plexiglass at the cashiers table,
sanitizer is available, and we wipe down high
frequency areas and carts after every use.
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BE SAFE. BE AWARE.
When shopping at Payne’s,
PLEASE practice SAFE “Social Distancing”
and you MUST WEAR A MASK,
keep 6 feet away from others
and cough in your elbow/sleeve.
PLEASE BE PATIENT WITH US!
This NEW NORMAL is taking some getting used to.

 

ALL SALES ARE FINAL.

Due to the COVID-19 health crisis and the possibility
of cross-contamination with the transferring
of your purchase to your car and in your house,
we cannot issue any refunds or exchanges.

VALERIE’S VIEW from the Greenhouse!

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UNDER-APPRECIATED SHRUBS!
I could almost count on one hand the shrubs customers seek.  Yes, we carry Russian Sage, Blue Mist spirea (caryopteris), butterfly bushes and the various brooms, but we also have lots of other wonderful shrubs.
For instance, we have the short and taller varieties of cotoneasters, all of which spread nicely.  These plants are colorful, have nice blooms and bear berries.  They are drought tolerant and deer resistant.  We have Mountain mahogany (cercocarpus montanus).  It is a broadleaf shrub that grows in well-drained soil in full sun.  It also tolerates dry to medium moisture.  It is evergreen, with insignificant flowers but beautiful seed pods.  Great for a hedge that does not look too formal.
One of my favorites, is Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Diablo’.  It has great form and color.  It is adaptable in terms of soil conditions, drought tolerant and easy to grow.  Come see what other great shrubs we have in stock.
STAY HEALTHY AND SAFE. HAPPY GARDENING!
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KID’S KORNER – KRAFT OF THE MONTH!

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 KID’S KORNER – KRAFT FOR JULY
Payne’s would like to get KIDS more involved
in the ART OF GARDENING!

browneyedsusan

CLICK HERE or the photo on the right of the Browneyed Susan — or
DOWNLOAD the PDF of this months coloring page for kids to color.
 
Scan or take a photo of the completed coloring page and email to info@paynes.com — and include the parent’s and kid’s names
and age of the artist.
 
At the end of the month, the most creative colored pages for each age group submitted will receive a “Gardening for Beginners Kit” from Payne’s. These are the age groups: 1 to 5, 6 to 9, and 10 to 13. Coloring submissions for kids up to 13 years old only please.
 
HAPPY COLORING!
Coloring pages courtesy of © 2020 National Gardening Association