FREEZE ALERT for TONIGHT through next WEEK!

The GARDEN GURU (AKA LYNN PAYNE) says to cover up your tender plants! It looks like our beautiful Fall weather is gearing up to FREEZE.

According to local weather reports, we will see a frost in Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico as early as Sunday evening. 
Freezing temperatures will probably continue through the next week.

Bring in any tender vegetation into the house and cover up any plants that you have outside with covers. Protect your plants with frost protection blankets available at both locations. Stop by today!

FALL is HERE! It’s the best time to plant everything! Stop by either location for a variety of these wonderful plants.

This week’s Advertising COUPON is for 25% OFF ANY ONE ITEM!

ASK THE GARDEN GURU!

WHY DO YOU SOMETIMES HAVE
TO FORCE YOUR BULBS
TO BLOOM?


ANOTHER GREAT QUESTION?

The Garden Guru continued the discussion about Fall bulbs but instead of planting those out in your garden and waiting until Spring for the “colorful show” … he gave a lesson on how to force them. 


Now the word “forcing” came about because one is forcing the bulb to bloom out of season. Forcing your bulbs to bloom is easy. You need to plant your bulbs in good potting soil in a pot and then put them in your refrigerator for three months! Then, when you take them out, put them in an area of a room that’s not in direct sunshine and they will bloom just like they would later on in your garden … but you’ll have the benefit of them blooming in January!

Now, if you don’t have room in your refrigerator then … what I would recommend, well you need to listen to Garden Guru’s tip to find out what to do?


CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE GARDEN GURU’S
ARCHIVED RADIO SHOW ON THIS TOPIC.

VALERIE’S VIEW from the Greenhouse!

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SANTA FE’S EVER CHANGING WEATHER.
 
New customers moving to our area have a hard time understanding our weather. I try to explain that we are not a desert, but more like a high desert as our climate is very dry with hot days and much cooler nights. At present, we are having day temperatures in the 70s with night temperatures in the upper 30s. We are expecting day temperatures to drop to the 40s, with night temperatures dropping into the 20s and possibly even a snowstorm or two. They come wondering when they can buy poinsettias to line their driveways or amaryllis bulbs to plant in pots outside. They are obviously disappointed, when I tell them these plants will not tolerate our ever fluctuating temperatures, but are great for decorating indoors.

Therefore, we guide the customer through all that is available now, like pansies and ornamental kale. We also have some very nice Cyclamen for indoor color. In addition we have some wonderful crafts made by our South store staff like the turkeys below. We have amaryllis and paper whites for planting now to enjoy later in the holiday season. For Christmas, we have many shades of poinsettias and again wonderful craft projects by the staff.  Come by to see what is happening in the greenhouse and in the store.

STAY HEALTHY AND SAFE. HAPPY GARDENING!

NOW IN STOCK! BACK TO EARTH SOIL MENDER!


Back To Earth compost can quickly start improvement of such soils, since it begins to function immediately, restoring vital organic matter and humus to soils, regardless of soil conditions.

Back To Earth Composted Cotton Burrs is an ideal general-purpose mulch for amending clay or sandy soils. Soils low in organic matter and humus or with poor tilth and structure cannot be rejuvenated with chemical fertilizers.


Get yours today at either location.

WE HAVE GRO-POWER WINTERIZER!


Gro-Power Winterizer 20 lb. Bags.
Now is the time to start feeding your plants, trees and shrubs Gro-Power Winterizer. This should be used as the last feeding in Fall, especially for areas like ours that actually have winters. Gro-Power Winterizer will aid in helping perennials, shrubs, trees and lawns withstand the cold winters and respond vigorously in spring. 

Gro-Power Winterizer 2-10-10contains low Nitrogen, high Phosphorus and Potash, plus micronutrients. 40% Humus, 8% Humic Acids and micronutrients.


Stop by both locations for this special winterizer in stock now.

AMARYLLIS IN STOCK NOW!

Payne’s just received a shipment of the biggest and best quality bulbs.
Amaryllis are one of the easiest bulbs to bring to bloom. Try your hand at planting these bulbs indoors in pots NOW so that you will have them in bloom for Christmas, New Year’s or  Valentines.

Once the bulb has bloomed, it can be kept in the pot and allowed to grow like any other houseplant. This will allow the Amaryllis bulbs to bloom on its own cycle as opposed to being forced to bloom for the holidays. 

Stop by either location and get yours today! Many colors to choose from! Hurry in, these will be going fast! Last year we ran out and had to order more.

HERE’S WHAT TO DO FOR NEXT YEAR’S SUCCESSFUL HARVEST!

 

Time to look back and see how your garden did this year. Any signs of malnutrition, such as slow or stunted growth, yellowing leaves, or lots of foliage and no fruit?

It’s easy to underestimate the fertility needs of a vigorous garden, particularly if there are older trees and shrubs around (their roots go sideways even more than they go downwards, and can suck up a lot of the nutrients you add to your other garden beds).

To ensure success again next year, use Gro-Power Winterizer as your last feeding and come March, start your trees, shrubs, and perennials back on a regular feeding schedule.

Mulch your perennial beds with a soil conditioner approximately mid-november because that will allow more time for the ground to freeze 1 to 2 inches deep. If you mulch the beds before a hard frost, rodents may burrow into the warm mulch.

But by the first hard frost, the critters will have found their winter hiding places and will be less of a threat. Apply a layer at least 3 or 4 inches deep (6 inches for especially cold or windy sites) around each plant, then, after you’ve done so, use your hands to gently pull the mulch a couple of inches away from trunks and stems to discourage fungus diseases.

WE JUST RECEIVED OUR PAPERWHITES FOR THE SEASON!

paperwhiteheader

Payne’s just received our Paperwhite Narcissus bulbs for the Holiday season. Hurry in because these will sell out AND we won’t be getting in another shipment!

When you buy Paperwhite narcissus bulbs from Payne’s, you buy the best bulbs available from our Dutch grower. Paperwhites are deliciously fragrant and don’t need cold treatment to be coaxed into bloom, as hyacinths and tulips do. Here’s how to bring your Paperwhites to flower.

paperwhitez1. Plant your bulbs in a well-drained soilless potting mix, like Ferti-Lome.

2. Choose a pot that’s only slightly larger than the bulb, or plant three bulbs in a large enough container to hold them 1 inch apart.

3. Plant the pointy end up and the base down.

4. Set the bulbs into the mix so that their top third is exposed above the surface.

5. Water with warm water, put the pot(s) in a sunny 50-60ºF room, and keep the soil just moist (not soggy, no standing water in the drip catchers!). They’ll bloom in about 6 weeks.

Some people prefer forcing Paperwhites using containers that don’t drain such as a soup bowl or deep platter. Put the bulbs in, pointy side up and then fill in with gravel covering approximately 3/4 of the bulb. Keep water in the bowl. Plant more bulbs in bowls or pots, every week or two, to space out the blossoming.

REGIONAL TO-DO LIST: SOUTHWEST GARDENING IN OCTOBER

Photo courtesy of Gardening Know How.

By: Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer – Gardening Know How

Southwest gardening in October is beautiful; summer has gradually winded down, days are shorter and more comfortable, and it’s a perfect time to be outdoors. Use this opportunity to take care of those October garden tasks. What to do in the Southwest in October? Read on for a regional to-do list.

  • Planting new perennials in October will give the roots time to establish before the cooler days of winter.
  • Fall is also a perfect time to divide existing perennials that are overcrowded or unproductive. Toss out old, dead centers. Replant the divisions or give them away.
  • Harvest winter squash, leaving one to three inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm.) of stem intact. Put the squash in a sunny spot for about ten days before moving them to a cool, dry spot for storage, but be sure to bring them in if nights are frosty. Pick green tomatoes when temperatures fall consistently below 50 degrees F. (10 C.). They’ll ripen indoors.
  • Plant garlic in full sun and well-drained soil. October is also a good time for planting horseradish. Plant cool season annuals like pansy, dianthus, and snapdragon.
  • Gradually decrease watering to harden plants for winter. Stop fertilizing by Halloween, especially if you expect hard freezes. Clean up leaves, dead plants, and other garden debris that may harbor pests and disease over the winter.
  • October garden tasks should include weed removal by hoeing, pulling, or mowing. Don’t allow pesky weeds to go to seed. Clean and oil pruners and other garden tools before putting them away for the winter.
  • Your regional to-do list should also include at least one visit to a botanical garden or arboretum in the Southwest. For example, Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, Santa Fe Botanical Garden, ABQ BioPark in Albuquerque, Red Butte Garden in Salt Lake City, or Ogden’s Botanical Gardens, and Red Hills Desert Garden, to name just a few.