ASK THE GARDEN GURU?

DO YOU KNOW WHY THEY SAY “THEY’RE GROWING LIKE WEEDS?

ANOTHER GREAT QUESTION!

Last week the Garden Guru mentioned that weeds are growing like … well “weeds”. Even with the limited amount of rain so far in this Monsoon season, they are still sprouting up! Lynn mentions some specific products that will help you get rid of them.


There are conventional and organic/natural weed killers that will meet your specific needs! Listen to Lynn’s tip on what household item may work to help get rid of the weeds! But you need to get the one that is “professional” grade! It has a few other ingredients that will help!

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE GARDEN GURU’S ARCHIVED RADIO SHOW ON THIS TOPIC.

HAPPY GARDENING!

WHAT TO DO IN JULY? FERTILIZATION, SOIL PREPARATION and WATERING!

 

Keep watering your garden regularly since it hasn’t been raining as in previous years. Remember that a few deep waterings a week (1 hour minimum on a drip system or soaker hose) are much better for your plants than many brief, shallow waterings. Shallow waterings encourage your plants’ roots to stay near the soil surface, where they can be dried out easily by our intense sunlight.

And speaking of mulch, your spring-spread organic mulch has probably decomposed by now, so you may want to renew it with another couple of inches of bark, compost, or Payne’s Soil Conditioner.

It’s also time again to fertilize your spring-blooming perennials and flowering shrubs so that the energy they expended flowering can be replaced against the oncoming stresses of winter.

wateringPAYNE’S RECOMMENDS:
We recommend a slow-release fertilizer like Gro-Power Plus for our organic gardeners and we have many choices of fertilizers that are not organic as well – and they all work great! Stop by and check them out.

TJs TIP:
Don’t forget that even with these monsoon rains, don’t let it fool you, a “slow rain” like a drizzle is much better than a HEAVY rain because the soil absorbs the water better if it comes slowly!

VALERIE’S VIEW from the Greenhouse!

 

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HUMMINGBIRDS ARE HERE!
 
With the recent rains, we are seeing more hummingbirds at our feeders and at those flowers from which they prefer to draw nectar. Over the years, we have had Agastache coming up everywhere in our gardens. Don’t know if the seeds just fell there or if the birds brought them there. Oh well, I do not care because they are beautiful no matter what.
 
Hummingbirds do not spend all day flying, as the energy cost would be prohibitive; the majority of their activity consists simply of sitting or perching. Hummingbirds eat many small meals and consume around half their weight in nectar (twice their weight in nectar, if the nectar is 25% sugar) each day.
 
Hummingbirds recognize and remember people and have been known to fly about their heads to alert them to empty feeders or sugar water that has gone bad. I have not seen the ‘bully’ yet, the Rufous hummingbird, which chases all the other hummers away.
 
Hummingbirds love agastaches, salvias, penstemons and snapdragons. Come see what we have in stock.
 
HAPPY GARDENING!
 

JOIN US TODAY!

Jethro the Cat , Pest Control Manager employed at Payne’s since 2009.

Payne’s proudly employs some of the best people in the horticulture industry. We value teamwork, camaraderie, fresh ideas, and hard work. 


Here are the positions currently available:
CASHIERS
GREENHOUSE PRODUCTION
NURSERY YARD SALES

If you are interested, please CLICK HERE and download the application and bring it to either Payne’s location.

DESIGNING A HUMMINGBIRD GARDEN: 10 WAYS TO KEEP THEM COMING!

By Stephen W. Kress – Hummingbird Gardens – Audubon . org

Hummingbirds prefer openings in the forest and forest edge, and so are readily drawn to suburban and rural gardens that offer a mix of tall trees, shrubs, and patches of meadow and lawn. They are less likely to frequent cities, perhaps because they find fewer flowering plants for food and trees for nesting. Yet even in the largest cities, hummingbirds occupy parks and sometimes visit window boxes or rooftop gardens planted with bright flowers, especially during migration.


Once hummingbirds discover your property, the same individuals are likely to return each year at about the same time; they are remarkable creatures of habit. The number of hummingbirds that frequent your yard is closely linked to the abundance of food, water, nesting sites, and perches. Following are 10 practical Steps you can take to create an ideal hummingbird garden.


Step 1
Draw a sketch of your yard, indicating the location of the house and outbuildings such as garages and tool sheds. Include trees, shrubs, existing flower beds, and other features likely to benefit hummingbirds. Work with these existing features, enhancing them with additional plantings.

Step 2
Using your landscape sketch, find a good spot to be the focus of your hummingbird garden. A site near a window or patio door will give you a front seat on the action. Hummingbird gardens need not be large—even a flower box or trellis will do. Gardens planted exclusively with hummingbird plants will attract more birds, but even a few choice plants added to existing gardens will feed some hummers.

Step 3
Think vertically when planning your hummingbird garden. Use trellises, trees, garden sheds, or other structures to support climbing vines; add window boxes, wooden tubs, or ceramic pots to create a terraced effect and provide growing places for a variety of plants.


Step 4
Select native plants for your garden. Learn which plants hummingbirds feed on in natural areas near your home. Native hummingbird plants and local hummingbird species have a long association in which plants serve as a reliable source of nectar at the same time each year. Keep in mind that cultivated varieties of impatiens and rhododendrons may look promising, but have little value to hummingbirds; these are selected for flower size, color, and shape, but are not good nectar producers. Do not plant exotic flowering plants, such as Japanese and tartarian honeysuckles, which are attractive to hummingbirds but invade neighboring fields and woodlands, crowding out more beneficial native shrubs and wildflowers.

CLICK HERE to read the full article.

PAYNE’S PHOTO OF THE WEEK!

PHOTO OF THE WEEK! 

SUNFLOWERS FROM PAYNE’S!

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SHARE YOUR PHOTOS! Please keep sending in your photos. 
You Could WIN a $25 Gift Card!
If you have a photo taken in one of our greenhouses or of your own garden orlandscape that contains products from Payne’s, please send it to info@paynes.com!

If your photo is chosen, and used in our e-newsletter website or other marketingmaterials, then you will receive a Gift Certificate from Payne’s for $25!Please make sure to give us your contact information in your email.

ZODIAC SIGNS AND GARDENING? HERE’S THIS CYCLES PROFILE.

by The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here’s THIS MONTHS ZODIAC SIGN PROFILE AND HOW IT CAN HELP YOU GARDEN:


CANCER (June 21 to July 20)
Cancer begins the summer. Because your sensitive soul loves to feed and nourish itself and others, nutritious plants such as sweet potatoes are near and dear to your heart. You find them easy to grow and will experiment with many recipes for their use. You are ruled by the Moon, so all nightblooming flowers are also akin to you. Evening primrose, moonflowers, evening stock, and night-blooming cereus fill the Cancer twilight garden with intoxicating scents and mystical magic. Hearty soups and casseroles on your dinner table are filled with everything that’s good for you.