FROM TOMATOES, SQUASH, CUCUMBERS to GREEN & RED CHILE, EGGPLANT, JALAPEÑOS and MORE — IT’S HARVEST TIME!

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From the local Farmer’s Market to your own backyard – freshly picked fruits and vegetables are perfect for this time of year! It’s time to enjoy the FRUITS of your labor!majchiletip2

Tomatoes, zucchini and peppers will come off the plant with a gentle nudge when they are ready. Otherwise, take scissors or a sharp knife to remove other vegetables and fruits.

IMPORTANT TIP: Don’t forget to leave an inch or so of a stem on the fruit or vegetable that you harvest so that it doesn’t rot when you don’t process/eat it right away.

MUM IS THE WORD FOR BEAUTIFUL FALL FLOWERS!

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Payne’s production staff is growing a big, beautiful crop of magnificent mums. Right now there is a great selection of sizes and colors, but like our pretty pansies, they sell quickly.

Mums can be successfully transplanted even when they’re in full bloom. Lighter colors, such as white and yellow, tend to bloom earlier than reds and purples. Plant in a sunny, well-drained soil, fertilize lightly, and keep just moist (don’t over water!) until established.

WHAT TO DO AT THE END OF AUGUST!

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Continue to plant container-grown trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, and biennials this month. The seeds of perennials, biennials, and cool season annuals may be sown outdoors now, such as rocket larkspur (Consolida ajacis), pansies (Viola x wittrockiana), Johnny-jump-ups (Viola tricolor), Oriental poppies (Papaver orientale), foxgloves (Digitalis sp.), fragrant wallflowers (Erysimum sp.), and sweet Williams (Dianthus barbatus).

Regional wildflower seed mixes are also popular. Reserve a bed just for the seeds. Work organic compost, mulch or peat moss into your seedbed, rake it smooth, plant your seeds, cover them with a thin layer of soil, then water the seedbed with a gentle spray from your hose (Payne’s sells suitable hose-heads) and rig some shade cloth over the bed so it doesn’t dry out. (Some of your seeds – if they’re from varieties that require a period of cold to trigger germination – may not emerge till next spring, so be patient.) After the hot weather passes, remove the shade cloth so the seedlings can harden off before winter.

Alternatively, you can simply let your blooming plants form and scatter their own seeds. If your soil is well-nourished, and your watering consistent, you should get lots of “volunteers” coming up from this fall till next spring.

iris_plantingTransplant spring-blooming perennials this month. Have the holes to which you are going to move your transplants fertilized and ready before you dig up and divide the mother clumps. Perennials that are typically divided now are irises (both bearded and Siberian), peonies and daylilies. Use a sharpened spade to divide the clumps. Plant them no deeper into the soil than they were before (peonies prefer to be buried with their crowns exactly two inches below the soil surface, use a ruler to make sure!). Firm them in gently, and water using a solution of SuperThrive™ or root stimulator both available at Payne’s that greatly reduces transplant shock. Remove a third of the foliage from your iris transplants after you’ve watered them in.

VALERIE’S VIEW from the GREENHOUSE!

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WE HAVE YOU COVERED!

If you want bigger blooms, remove all but the main bud in each cluster. Stake the tall stalks so the monsoon winds and rains don’t break them. Remember to continue feeding them, Payne’s has many fertilzers to choose from.

HINT:  When watering Dahlias, never water from the TOP, always water the soil, not the leaves or flowers or you may develop some problems such as powdery mildew.

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HAPPY GARDENING!

 

THE GARDEN GURU ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT ROSES!

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In last week’s segment, the Garden Guru chatted about questions he receives about roses and what gardening steps you should do with your rose bushes at this time. Lynn said that with the rain comes increased humidity and with the increased humidity comes fungus problems with the most common being Powdery Mildew. During this moist season, powdery mildew occurs on Roses, Lilacs, Apple trees, Euonymus and even Zinnias especially if they’re growing in a semi-shaded area. But not to worry about the Powdery Mildew, it’s easy to take care of. There’s lots of different fungicides available and Payne’s has a very safe one to use. Listen to Lynn’s tip for more information on how to care for your precious roses.

Tune in every Friday on KHFM Radio (95.5 FM) between 4 and 5 pm you’ll hear Lynn Payne’s tip of the week. The “Garden Guru” himself provides information on different topics including gardening tips, fun facts about plants, how to plant and prepare your garden for each season and special announcements. CLICK below to listen.

 

PHOTO OF THE WEEK! Garden Mums

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SHARE YOUR PHOTOS! Please keep sending in your photos! If you have a photo taken in one of our greenhouses or of your own garden or landscape that you would like to share, please send it to info@paynes.com! If your photo is chosen, and used in our e-newsletter or on our website, then you will receive a Gift Certificate from Payne’s for $25! Please make sure to give us your contact information in your email.