SMOTHER INSECT EGGS WITH DORMANT OIL

dormant oil whiteNow that Spring is just a little more than a month away, it’s time to treat your fruit trees and evergreens with horticultural oil spray, also known as dormant oil spray. We have everything you need, including expert tips, to help protect your trees. Dormant and horticultural oil sprays work by smothering overwintering insect eggs. Please make sure it’s above 50 degrees before you spray and before it freezes at night.

The first spray of the season should be applied as the buds on the tree or shrub begin to swell, but before they open.

CLICK HERE to learn more about how to use Dormant Oil.

IN STOCK NOW! Stop by either location today.

TJ’s TIP: Don’t spray when it’s windy and cover anything you don’t want oil to get on because it will be difficult to remove or clean.

TIME TO STOP IN AND CHECK OUT OUR HARD GOODS! BOTH LOCATIONS GETTING SHIPMENTS WEEKLY

northhardgoods3We’re all getting excited about the prospect of Spring. Especially, since we really haven’t had a “real” winter! Since its been so warm, we are all anxious to get our gardens going. Both locations just received a shipment of hard goods that will get you excited to get outside! A great selection from:

  • northhardgoods2Shovels
  • Hoses
  • Weed barrier
  • Chemicals
  • Plant food
  • Pots and saucers
  • and so much more!

Stop by today!

WET LEAVES CAN KILL YOUR LAWN! BEWARE OF DEAD LEAVES FROM LAST FALL!

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Now that the weather is a little warmer, it’s a good idea to bring out the rake and start cleaning up any wet leaves that are still on your grass from last Fall BEFORE you even begin to THINK about watering!

Thick layers of wet leaves covering your lawn blocks your grass from receiving the air and sunlight that it needs to remain healthy. Some homeowners run a mulching mower over fallen leaves and let the cut-up pieces remain on the lawn, thinking that these mowed leaves are like mulch that will help-or at least not hurt-the lawn. It’s true that mulched leaves can be beneficial for topsoil. But it is vital that most of the mulched leaf pieces get down into the lawn rather than remain on top where they continue to prevent sun from reaching the grass blades.

Its also best to rake your wet leaves so they don’t create a breeding ground for pests and diseases.

WHAT TO DO IN FEBRUARY? ANNUALS and BIENNIALS

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February’s a great month to get your seeds for this year’s crop of annual flowers. Buy now and avoid the last minute rush, because by May 15th, our last official frost date, a lot of stores will have run out of the highest-demand seeds.

Our number #1 best-selling annual flower seed? Blue-flowered morning glories (Ipomoea purpurea ‘Clarke’s Heavenly Blue’), followed closely by sunflowers (Helianthus annuus).

If you have a greenhouse, fluorescent light plant-growing units, or a very sunny sunroom, late February isn’t too early to start seeds of begonias, petunias, pansies, violas, lobelias, and snapdragons, which take a long time to mature to blooming size.

We’ll have plenty of lovely annuals for sale in four-packs starting in March.

VALERIE’S VIEW from the Greenhouse!

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FINALLY A LITTLE RAIN!

Several of the calls I have received lately are from customers who are asking whether they should be watering their gardens as we have had no moisture. But, they are afraid that if they water, the plants will grow and freeze. Others indicate to me that their bulbs are popping out of the ground and wonder if they should mulch them to prevent them from freezing.

My answers are, Yes to water and No to mulch. A plant that is well hydrated will endure a freeze much better than a plant that is dry. There is not much we can do about this crazy Weather. As it happens quite often in this part of the country, just as the lilacs and apricot trees are getting ready to bloom, we get a freeze.  Ugh! Because we have had no moisture and very warm days, the bulbs are starting to pop. Again, just water. Too much mulch will suffocate the bulb and kill it. We cannot control Mother Nature. Just keep praying for more rain.

HAPPY GARDENING!

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WHAT THE ROMANS HAD TO DO WITH THE LEGEND OF VALENTINE’S DAY!

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Last week, the Garden Guru gave us a history lesson about the origins of Valentine’s Day. Legend has it that back during the Roman Empire, there was this guy named Valentinas and he had this habit of cutting hearts out of red parchment paper and handing them out to people that he would run across. Now some of the people that he gave them to were soldiers of the Roman army… and one of the things that he was doing that kind of got him into trouble was that he was performing weddings for lovesick soldiers!

Now weddings were frowned upon by the folks of the Roman army because they thought that soldiers have to keep their mind on fighting and nothing else. So when they found out who was performing these weddings they rounded up for little Valentina’s and they threw them in jail. Well in jail he met the jailers daughter and she was blind! Well -legend has it that somehow he cured her of his blindness and the jailer became kind of fond of this Valentinas guy! So the jailer did him some special favors! And just before his execution… WELL… you need to listen to the Garden Guru to find out what happened to Valentinas?

Tune in every Friday on KHFM Radio (95.5 FM) between 4 and 5 pm you’ll hear Lynn Payne’s tip of the week. The “Garden Guru” himself provides information on different topics including gardening tips, fun facts about plants, how to plant and prepare your garden for each season and special announcements.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK – YOUNG RED ROSE FROM SUMMER from Payne’s North!

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If you have a photo taken in one of our greenhouses or of your own garden or
landscape that contains products from Payne’s,
please send it to info@paynes.com!

If your photo is chosen, and used in our e-newsletter website or
other marketing materials, then you will receive a
Gift Certificate from Payne’s for $25!
Please make sure to give us your contact information in your email.